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Temnocidaris (Stereocidaris) sceptrifera sceptrifera (Mantell, 1822)

 

Temnocidaris sceptrifera sceptrifera possesses some of the largest and most spectacular primary spines of the chalk cidaroids.  They are elongate, with coarse, well developed spiny ornament and a flared tip.  Mostly they possess a swollen proximal portion, which distinguishes them from the superficially similar Temnocidaris intermedia whose primary spines are of a constant width along their length.  However, the adoral primary spines of T. sceptrifera sceptrifera are not swollen and can be indistinguishable from those of T. intermedia.  Ranges from the Coniacian to the Campanian.

     

 

1).  Temnocidaris sceptrifera sceptrifera - Adoral view of a spectacular new specimen, retaining a largely articulated complement of primary spines and scrobicular spines and with the tip of the articulated lantern protruding through the peristomal plating and mesh of adoral-most spines which appear to have closed over the mouth opening (x2.0, Seaford Chalk, 0.3m above Rowe's Echinoid Band, Thanet, Kent, in the collection of Keith Little).  Image 2012 Keith Little, by kind permission.

       

2).  Temnocidaris sceptrifera sceptrifera - Typical primary spine from the ambital region of the testl with a thick swollen proximal portion, and a long and tapering distal portion with a slightly flared tip.  Dense ornament of small thorns curved slightly towards the distal end and arranged in closely spaced longitudinal rows (x3, Seven Sisters, Seaford Chalk Formation, Randell Collection, RR1185)

           

 A B 

3).  Temnocidaris sceptrifera sceptrifera - A remarkable specimen, with a near complete and articulated complement of primary spines and scrobicular spines (White Chalk,  Booth Museum BMB 024370, by kind permission of John Cooper). (A) Adoral view, x1.4; (B) Detail of articulated primary spine and the associated scrobicular spines, x4.0.

        
  
 A B 

4).  Temnocidaris sceptrifera sceptrifera - (A) Partial test with spines (x1.3, White Chalk, Booth Museum BMB 024387).  (B) Crushed test with spines (x1.3, White Chalk, Booth Museum BMB 024368).  Both by kind permission of John Cooper.

   

  A B 

5).  Temnocidaris sceptrifera sceptrifera - Small and exceptionally preserved individual; a significant proportion of the peristomal plating is retained, and the Aristotle's Lantern (jaw-parts) is seen protruding through them; (A) general view of the test (x4); (B) magnified view of peristome (x7) (White Chalk, HCCMS (Hampshire County Council Museum's Service) collection, stored at Gosport Museum, G.1983.393 by kind permission of Dave Kemp, HCCMS).   

        

 A B 

6).  Temnocidaris sceptrifera sceptrifera - (A) Adapical view of a fragment from a very well preserved individual, retaining the apical plating (x4, Beachy Head, White Chalk, Randell Collection, RR1692).   (B) A large, complete test lacking articulated spines (x1.3, White Chalk, probably Lewes Nodular Chalk, Willett Collection, Booth Museum, by kind permission of John Cooper).kind permission of John Cooper).

     

 A B 

7).  Temnocidaris sceptrifera sceptrifera - (A) Detail of a peculiar branched spine, perhaps regrowth after a predatory attack (x3.0, White Chalk, Booth Museum BMB 024368).  A Detail showing an isolated hemipyramid (x4.5, White Chalk, Booth Museum BMB 024368).  Both by kind permission of John Cooper).

         

8).  Temnocidaris sceptrifera sceptrifera - Lateral view (upside-down) of a small (juvenile?) individual with some spines (x2.6, White Chalk, HCCMS (Hampshire County Council Museum's Service) collection, stored at Gosport Museum, G.1983.393, by kind permission of Dave Kemp, HCCMS).